Category Archives: Fiction

Greener than Green

by J. T. Townley

So I rang the bell, Chuck answered, and we stared at each other through the screen door.  You remember Chuck. He had a cold beer in his hand. He still wore his uniform, though untucked, shoeless, no gun. He grimaced at my companions, then said: Continue reading

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The Side Effects of Placebos

by Karen Wunsch

On an overcast day in December Sophie, thirty-three, had lunch with her dad at a small French restaurant near the Museum of Modern Art. He used to eat there with his parents. She and her dad particularly liked the omelettes. Looking out the window she saw it was drizzling and realized she’d forgotten her umbrella. She knew that although her dad was going back to work and she’d be going home, he’d urge her to take his.
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Prague Spring

by Trish Annese

I meet M. in Prague on a lonesome Sunday in March as I chase a lost turquoise scarf down an asphalt alley and she retrieves it, stepping from the recesses of a darkened doorway—a mistress of ceremonies stepping into the spotlight—and restoring it to me with a flourish.
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England, 1580

by Kathryn Haueisen
(from Mayflower Chronicles: The Tale of Two Cultures)

William rode on alone for another half hour until he spotted a house at the edge of a forest. Smoke rising from the stone chimney gave him hope this might be where he and Good Fortune could rest for the night. A dog barking announced his approach. William stayed mounted as the barking spaniel ran circles around them. Good Fortune moved back and forth and side to side to dodge the dog. Mercifully, the horse didn’t rear up. Continue reading

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Paper Calendar

by Darryl Halbrooks

“When was the last time you talked to your dad?” Jennifer asks.

“I don’t know, maybe five years. Something like that.”

“I know you don’t want to, but maybe you should call.”

“I’ve seen grown men pull their own heads off rather than talk to Dad.”

She ignores my oft-used Monty Python line.

“He’s in the vulnerable population you know.” Continue reading

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