Koa

by Black Knox

And so they went Mauka in their four wheel drives
Jolting beyond the heat pitted lava crust ever higher into the cool canopy, limbs spreading above towering
Trunks
Swelling thick boughs
Remote Island in the midst of a vast
Slumbering blue
The only place on earth where one can still find these primordial trees, the Koa
And the Native Hapu‘u Continue reading

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When the Glitter Hits the Ground

by Wendy J. Fox

In the tiny house they lived in, Kathleen’s three sisters were all older than she was, her three brothers all younger; she was a middle child by chronology but also the last of the girls, the elder to the small boys. Her brother Sammy was the closest in age, just eleven months apart. As children, they were always together, grubby hands clasped, with the two other brothers padding behind. When Kathleen’s sisters were rouging their cheeks and stealing cigarettes, she was in the trees, in a pair of hand-me-down jeans, hair tangled, hands scraped and scabby. One by one the sisters left, into early marriages and cashier jobs, but the house was just as cramped as the boys grew taller, their massive feet spreading into the vacated space, and the drains still clogged with hair as they passed puberty and proceeded to directly balding, like their father. Continue reading

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Swallow

by Jocelyn Sears

I’ll leave the lions
to you, the elephants with their tusks white
and chiseled as pieces of soap. Let me
be a swallow. Continue reading

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True Ash

by Elizabeth J. Colen and Carol Guess

If trees could talk, you said. If they could tell us what they saw.

But if you didn’t want to talk about it, why would a tree?

We walked in the arboretum as if nothing had happened. Past Japanese Maples, Witch Hazels, Legumes. Through Pinetum and across the stone footbridge. The math of it, was what you said. Continue reading

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Old Man

by Lucille Lang Day

For Bill

Old man, gaunt, with scraggly gray hair
and cancer of the spine, greeting me
from your deathbed, what binds us now is
the past—the night when you were seventeen
and I was drunk and you pulled me away
from the boys who would abuse me. Continue reading

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