Tag Archives: Family

My Father’s Country

by Arya F. Jenkins

Eight years old I stood in
My red bathing suit bottoms on black soil
Enshrouded in a chapel of the
Largest greenest leaves I’d ever seen
Next to the pink ranch house in Key Biscayne

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Black Sedan

by Sean Madden

The kid at Coyote Pond, six, maybe seven, a ruffled
head of hair, a neighborhood boy whose name
I once learned–he’s making me nervous, nervous
in a way I feel sheepish about, a way that’s borderline
irrational, the way he’s bouncing around the playground,
firing cap guns, shooting things only he can see.

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Pelican

by E.H. Jacobs

I don’t know when the nickname “Pelican” completely replaced my father’s given name, but that’s what he’s been called since before I was born fifty years ago in a community hospital in Brooklyn, a hospital whose name has disappeared into the chasm of memory. My mom, his second wife, the one who stuck with him long enough to procreate, called him Pelican–not honey, or dear, or even asshole, which was how I heard his third wife refer to him. The first time I remember actually hearing his name was when I accompanied him to a doctor’s appointment and the assistant called out “Earl?”–and I looked around to see who was being summoned–before she called out “Earl Roberts?” and I saw him stand. Continue reading

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Eulogy for Stanley and Rose

by Lenny DellaRocca

The woman downstairs has hired a man to tear apart everything
she owns. Since her husband died
she carries grief around
in a suitcase of birthdays.
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Paper Calendar

by Darryl Halbrooks

“When was the last time you talked to your dad?” Jennifer asks.

“I don’t know, maybe five years. Something like that.”

“I know you don’t want to, but maybe you should call.”

“I’ve seen grown men pull their own heads off rather than talk to Dad.”

She ignores my oft-used Monty Python line.

“He’s in the vulnerable population you know.” Continue reading

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